1:30 to 2:30 p.m. CDT

Guided tour of OI Museum galleries from Mesopotamia to Ancient Egypt

The Oriental Institute (OI) is the University of Chicago’s—and one of the world’s—very first interdisciplinary institutes and a world-renowned museum, housing some 350,000 artifacts, excavated mainly by OI archaeologists. Together, the OI Museum collections comprise one of the best resources in the world for the ancient Middle East and North Africa, allowing us to understand, reveal, and protect the past. The OI Museum displays objects in permanent galleries devoted to ancient Egypt, Nubia, Persia, Mesopotamia, Syria, Anatolia, and the Levant, as well as rotating special exhibitions.

Guided Tour of Monochrome Multitudes

Explore the global resonance and creative possibilities of “the monochrome” during this guided tour of Monochrome Multitudes at the Smart Museum led by UChicago graduate students. This exhibition offers an expanded history of 20th and 21st century art through more than 100 monochromatic works.

This tour will be led by graduate student Claire Rich (MAPH 2023)

Guided Tour of Making Sense of Marbles: Roman Sculpture at the OI

Come learn about the new special exhibition, Making Sense of Marbles: Roman Sculpture at the OI, co-curated by Kiersten Neumann, OI Museum interim chief curator, and Roko Rumora, PhD candidate, Department of Art History, University of Chicago. This exhibit brings together a group of Roman sculptures from the OI’s collection and presents them on view as a group for the first time, including two life-size marble sculptures.

Guided Tour of Passing Through: Artists from DoVA 2012–2021

The Reva and David Logan Center for the Arts, opened in 2012, is a multidisciplinary arts center at the University of Chicago. Designed by renowned architects Tod Williams and Billie Tsien, the building integrates classroom, performance, and exhibition spaces to create a dynamic collaborative environment for arts and scholarship. It is a space for academic and artistic work by UChicago students, faculty, visiting artists and scholars, professional organizations, and community partners.

Rachel DeWoskin

Rachel DeWoskin is the award-winning author of five novels: Someday We Will Fly (Penguin Random House, 2019); Banshee (Dottir Press, 2019); Blind (Penguin Random House, 2015); Big Girl Small (FSG, 2011);

(Virtual Session) The Friending Plot

Was the marriage plot of 18th- and 19th-century English literature, which saw women characters stake their futures to domesticity, universal? What were the colonies' plotlines? In Triniday during the 1920s and 1930s, a group of writers penned short stories about working-class women who—amidst a global depression and personal hardship—reject marriage in favor of casual, transactional relationships known as "friending." This session offers the friending plot, in which subsistence, giving and receiving care, and pleasure in the present are the order of the day.

The Friending Plot

Was the marriage plot of 18th- and 19th-century English literature, which saw women characters stake their futures to domesticity, universal? What were the colonies' plotlines? In Trinidad during the 1920s and 1930s, a group of writers penned short stories about working-class women who—amidst a global depression and personal hardship—reject marriage in favor of casual, transactional relationships known as "friending." This session offers the friending plot, in which subsistence, giving and receiving care, and pleasure in the present are the order of the day.

Tools for Serious Readers: Logeion and PhiloLogic

Classics scholars and casual readers have many options on the internet to find their favorite texts, ranging from large-scale projects to smaller niche sites. This is as true today as it was a decade ago. So why jump in and learn a whole new set of skills to build your own? In this session, the presenter gives a brief tour of the projects developed in collaboration with her students during the past decade, and how they can support scholars and teachers, but also casual readers of Greek and Latin.

Russian Media at War

Russian state media have presented an entirely different picture of the war in Ukraine to their viewers. The presenter looks closely at footage from early days of the invasion and at key moments in the spring such as Easter, when the Russian campaign was depicted as a righteous struggle to preserve sacred values and the Victory Day celebration, which highlighted the Immortal Battalion movement in linking the events of today to those of the fight against Nazi Germany. The talk closes with consideration of problems in media representation of the war on both sides of the conflict.

Implementing Virtual Reality in Spanish and Portuguese Courses

This presentation showcases examples of the technological and pedagogical virtual reality materials that the presenters have created, designed, and implemented in intermediate Portuguese and Spanish language classes in the Department of Romance Languages and Literatures at the University of Chicago. The presenters will provide information about the Virtual Reality (VR) and Language teaching project funded by the College Curricular Innovation Fund and the Exploratory Teaching Groups at the UChicago.

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